Charity Programs

Please consider knitting for any of the following organizations – a small, quick project is so rewarding! Want something new? Go to the web sites listed below and find new patterns. Do enjoy and have fun! You’ll love yourself for it.

Afghans for Afghans

Get involved. Your knitted or crocheted creation will directly help an Afghan woman, man, or child who greatly needs the caring, warm embrace of your personal, handmade gift. Please use 100% wool to provide maximum utility in harsh weather. Please do not incorporate representational images, such as animals, because Islam prohibits depicting such likenesses. Numerous patterns are available on their web site plus hints as to where to purchase natural fibers at really good prices.

For more info visit their website:  www.Afghansforafghans.org


Cubs for Kids

“Cubs for Kids,” a national charity based in White Plains, was started 17 years ago with the goal of putting a smile on the face of a homeless child. Each child in a shelter is given a teddy bear with a hand knitted sweater, hat and scarf, a unique and special gift. You can find the patterns for these items on Ravelry.


Hawkwing

Hawkwing is a not for profit organization dedicated to helping those in need on the Cheyenne River Lakota Reservation. The Lakota children live in poverty. The winters are very cold with sub zero temperatures and high winds. They could use warm clothing in all sizes. Some of the items they could use are: Gloves/Mittens, Hats/Headbands/Earmuffs, socks, sweaters and Leggings.

For more info visit their website: www.hawkwing.org


Jansen Hospice and Palliative Care Center

Jansen Hospice, a local not-for-profit organization, provides services to patients who wish to live in their own homes. They ask volunteers to knit 32” square lap blankets. The blankets should be made with acrylic, hopefully soft, in many pattern and cheery colors. For more information visit their website: www.jansenhospice.org


Kids’ Kloset (a program of Westchester Jewish Community Services)

Kids’ Kloset is a volunteer-driven program that provides Westchester County children, newborn to 18 years of age, in need with donated clothing. Agencies determine the needs of each family and work with Kids’ Kloset to secure and then distribute the clothing. I recommend using yarns that are easy to launder, i.e., acrylic or acrylic/wool blends. For more information visit their website:

For more info visit their website: www.wjcs.com/kids-kloset/


Metro World Child

Metro World Child is a Christian non-profit organization that serves the inner city children and their families of NYC and other cities throughout the world.  They are in desperate need of “everything and anything” for infants through adults, girls and boys, women and men.  Whatever we would like to send them would be greatly appreciated and immediately disseminated through their Won-by-One Sponsorship Program, which makes weekly visits to hurting children and their families in NYC.

For more info visit their website:  http://www.metroworldchild.org


Mini-blankets for Adopted Kittens or Puppies

    Use up all those scrap yarns which aren’t sufficient for any other project by making mini-blankets for the carriers in which new pet parents take home their newly adopted kitten or puppy.

     Yarns of all types and thicknesses can be used.  Combine thin yarns to join to worsteds or bulky ones.  Mix colors; be as creative as you like.  Knit or crochet. Our projects will be donated to pet adoption agencies which use them as warm, welcoming liners for the carriers of the newly adopted pets. Size:  approx. 10” X 18” will cover the bottom of a medium size pet carrier but we are not restricted to this size. Materials: any yarns of your choosing


Seamen’s Institute

The Seamen’s Church Institute brings hospitality and love to deep-sea and river mariners by distributing gifts containing handmade scarves, caps, vests, helmets or socks, as well as other useful items. These gifts are knitted or crocheted by more than 4,000 volunteers from every state. Each year, more than 17,000 gifts are distributed. Again, knitting patterns are available plus you can purchase from them skeins of yarn for a suggested contribution of $2.50 per skein. They provide a form requesting your name and address (of course) and which item(s) you consider making. When you go to their web site, click on “How You Can Help” and note options on the left side of the screen. I found most information by clicking on “Christmas-at-Sea.” Use yarn that can be laundered by machines. They would love to have our help.

For more info visit their website: www.seamenschurch.org


VA Hospital

I have collected hats and scarves for veterans who are down on their luck and seek help from the Veterans Administration hospital. Again, easy-to-launder- yarns are recommended. If you have a substantial amount of yarn waiting for a worthy cause, you might consider a vest – that would really be appreciated. Again, I deliver them directly to the hospital.


Warm Up America

This organization collects “squares” [which are 7” X 9”] and then sews them together to make afghans for homeless people. They also collect caps for underweight babies and preemies and send them to Africa. They request smooth, washable yarn be used; remember: no seam on the preemie caps. If you go to their web site you will find patterns;click on Resources, then “patterns,” scroll down to the knit patterns.

For more info visit their website:  www.warmupamerica.org


Westchester County Medical Center (preemie items)

We have quite a reputation at the WCMC Children’s Hospital. Whenever I bring in a bag or two of preemie hats and/or blankets, the staff is so excited to see what they’ve received. Our reputation precedes us! Now we can use washable yarns, even 75% acrylic and 25% wool, but remember no seams on the preemie caps.

If you have a favorite charity you would like to donate to, please let us know – either designate which charity your project should be sent to or suggest a new organization. We will more than welcome additional organizations.

Dorothy Freeman and Linda Cramer